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Saturday, December 10

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  • Nocturnal Animals

    3:30pm, 6:00pm, 8:30pm

    Nocturnal Animals
    • Starring: Amy Adams, Jake Gyllenhaal, Laura Linney, Isla Fisher, Michael Shannon
    • Director: Tom Ford
    • Genre(s): Drama, Thriller
    • Rating: R
    • Running Time: 115 min.
    "Style is substance in Ford’s second film. Unlike many puzzle-piece movies, it thrills on every level. "
    - Kevin Harley, Total Film
    "Ford is a true moviemaker — a social observer who’s a junkie for sensation and narrative. He has structured Nocturnal Animals beautifully, so that the past feeds into the present, and fiction into reality. "
    - Owen Gleiberman, Variety
    "The film once again demonstrates that Ford is both an intoxicating sensualist and an accomplished storyteller, with as fine an eye for character detail as he has for color and composition. "
    - David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter
    "Tom Ford’s first film since ‘A Single Man’ is another winner, an ambitious high-wire noir thriller with Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal in an explosive tale of love, violence, and revenge. "
    - Owen Gleiberman, Variety
    "All the more impressive for being two movies in one: the kind of “sad people in nice houses” tale you might expect from the couturier-turned-filmmaker, and a down-and-dirty West Texas revenge thriller that calls to mind Sam Peckinpah. "
    - Alonso Duralde, TheWrap
    "With everything going on, Nocturnal Animals is the sort of narrative and tonal minefield that a lesser director could easily have gotten lost in. Ford allows us to consider and cherish each unique thread and wonder just how it could all possibly come together "
    - Rory O'Connor, The Film Stage
    "Nocturnal Animals is an impressively ambitious effort, one part mean Texas thriller, one part middle-age melodrama, and makes for a meta-textual riddle that is almost as pleasurable to reflect on as it to actually watch. "
    - Ben Croll, Indiewire
  • Loving

    1:00pm, 4:15pm

    Loving
    • Starring: Ruth Negga, Joel Edgerton, Michael Shannon, Marton Csokas, Nick Kroll
    • Director: Jeff Nichols
    • Genre(s): Biography, Drama, History
    • Rating: PG-13
    • Running Time: 123 min.
    "Nichols—director of Take Shelter, Mud and, most recently, Midnight Special—tells the Lovings’ story in a way that feels immediate and modern, and not just like a history lesson. "
    - Stephanie Zacharek, Time
    "Nichols has crafted a beautifully moving and tasteful document of a quietly groundbreaking event, told from a very human perspective. "
    - Rory O'Connor, The Film Stage
    "Filmmaker Jeff Nichols (Mud; Take Shelter) has recreated the world lived in by Richard and Mildred Loving for a new feature film made with authenticity and laudable restraint. "
    - James Berardinelli, ReelViews
    "Intimate, moving and superbly underplayed, “Loving” is every bit as soft-spoken and subtly implacable as its protagonists. "
    - Ann Hornada, Washington Post
    "The performances are very fine. Watching Negga, I was afraid to blink - I wanted to see everything that passed between Mildred and Richard, no matter how fleeting. "
    - David Edelstein, New York Magazine/Vulture
    "For all of its subtlety and restraint, “Loving” washes over you, seeps into your blood stream and remains there long after the film is over. "
    - Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service
    "The stabbing simplicity of Negga’s acting is breathtaking. Jeff Nichols has given us a quietly devastating film that resonates for the here and now and marches to the cadences of history and the heart. "
    - Peter Travers, Rolling Stone
    "The real artistry of Loving … is in the quiet grace Negga and Edgerton bring to one of recent history’s most important romances. "
    - Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly
  • Moonlight

    6:45pm, 9:00pm

    Moonlight
    • Starring: Andre Holland, Mahershala Ali, Naomie Harris, Janelle Monáe
    • Director: Barry Jenkins
    • Genre(s): Drama
    • Rating: NR
    • Running Time: 110 min.
    "It’s a masterpiece — an overused word, but not the wrong one. "
    - John Anderson, Wall Street Journal
    "In its quietly radical grace, it’s a cultural watershed — a work that dismantles all the ways our media view young black men and puts in their place a series of intimate truths. You walk out feeling dazed, more whole, a little cleaner. "
    - Ty Burr, Boston Globe
    "Directed with superb control and insight by Jenkins, Moonlight achieves the near-impossible in film, which is to ground its story and characters in a place and time of granular specificity and simultaneously make them immediately relatable and universal. "
    - Ann Hornaday, Washington Post
    "Jenkins glimpses at the human soul and the hellish experiences endured despite it. We’re shown humankind’s capacity to change and the notion it’s never too late. "
    - Jared Mobarak, The Film Stage
    "A coming-of-age movie, and a love story, that leaves you feeling both stripped bare and restored, slightly better prepared to step out and face the world of people around you, with all the confounding challenges they present. There’s not much more you can ask from a movie. "
    - Stephanie Zacharek, Time
    "Moonlight, the new film from Barry Jenkins, is a nuclear-fission-strength heartbreaker. It’s made up of moments so slight and incidental they’re sub-molecular – but they release enough heat and light to swallow whole cities at a stroke. "
    - Robbie Collin, The Telegraph
    "It’s a true American masterpiece and one of the best films of the decade. "
    - Tirdad Derakhshani, Philadelphia Inquirer
    "Moonlight is a film that is both lyrical and deeply grounded in its character work, a balancing act that’s breathtaking to behold. It is one of those rare pieces of filmmaking that stays completely focused on its characters while also feeling like it’s dealing with universal themes about identity, sexuality, family, and, most of all, masculinity. "
    - Brian Tallerico, RogerEbert.com
    "Moonlight takes the pain of growing up and turns it into hardened scars and private caresses. This film is, without a doubt, the reason we go to the movies: to understand, to come closer, to ache, hopefully with another. "
    - Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out New York
    "It’s a thrilling, deeply necessary work that opens up a much-needed and rarely approached on-screen conversation about the nature of gay masculinity. "
    - Benjamin Lee, The Guardian
    "Like Brokeback Mountain a decade ago, Moonlight is a piece of art that will transform lives long after it leaves theaters. "
    - Gregory Ellwood, The Playlist
    "It’s a film that aches with beauty. It cries with longing. It quakes with a rich sadness that lingers with you long after the final moments. A masterpiece of poetic filmmaking, Moonlight is one of the most powerful films of the year. "
    - Erin Whitney, ScreenCrush
    "Barry Jenkins’ vital portrait of a South Florida youth revisits the character at three stages in his life, offering rich insights into the contemporary African-American experience. "
    - Peter Debruge, Variety
    "The result is an unconventional film that exists in a class by itself to this point in 2016. "
    - Mike Scott, New Orleans Times-Picayune
    "Moonlight is both a disarmingly, at times almost unbearably personal film and an urgent social document, a hard look at American reality and a poem written in light, music and vivid human faces "
    - A.O. Scott, NY Times
    "Moonlight is magic. So intimate you feel like you’re trespassing on its characters souls, so transcendent it’s made visual and emotional poetry out of intensely painful experience, it’s a film that manages to be both achingly familiar and unlike anything we’ve seen before. "
    - Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times
  • ON STAGE: War Horse

    12:30pm

    ON STAGE: War Horse
    • Starring: Nigel Allen, Derek Arnold, Alex Avery
    • Writer(s): Nick Stafford, Michael Morpurgo,
    • Director: Marianne Elliott
    • Genre(s): Drama, Performance
    • Rating: Unrated
    • Filmed at London's National Theatre Feb. 27, 2014
    • Running Time: 180 min.
    "Staged with thrilling flair… uncannily beautiful equine puppets created by the South African company, Handspring. A superlative sense of emotional depth. "
    - Paul Taylor, Independent
    "imaginative, moving new Broadway drama "
    - Thom Geier, Entertainment Weekly
    "Sweeping drama of extraordinary power… Its sheer skill and invention are simply awe-inspiring. "
    - The Times
    "Genius isn’t too strong a word to describe this astonishing production "
    - Charles Spencer, The Telegraph
    "The most moving and spectacular play in London. "
    - Sunday Express
    "‘War Horse only confirms the National’s extraordinary knack of turning children’s literature into the finest drama. Stunning. "
    - Sunday Times
    "“…it is how Joey is summoned into being, along with an assortment of other animals, that gives this production its ineffably theatrical magic…Beautifully designed by Rae Smith … and Paule Constable, this production is also steeped in boilerplate sentimentality. Beneath its exquisite visual surface, it keeps pushing buttons like a sales clerk in a notions shop. "
    - Ben Brantley, The New York Times

Coming Soon

T/F Teaser: Do Not Resist

starts December 11

As a teaser of the sort of great documentaries and post show discussion you can expect at the True/False Film Fest we will be screening Do Not Resist.

An urgent and powerful exploration of the rapid militarization of the police in the United States. Starting on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, as the community grapples with the death of Michael Brown, DO NOT RESIST - the directorial debut of Detropia cinematographer Craig Atkinson - offers a stunning look at the current state of policing in America and a glimpse into the future. The Tribeca Film Festival winner for Best Documentary puts viewers in the center of the action - from a ride-along with a South Carolina SWAT team and inside a police training seminar that teaches the importance of “righteous violence” to the floor of a congressional hearing on the proliferation of military equipment in small-town police departments - before exploring where controversial new technologies including predictive policing algorithms could lead the field next.

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THE NEVERENDING STORY (1984)

starts December 16

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Summary: Wolfgang Petersen adapted Michael Ende’s children’s story for this charming fantasy film that spawned several sequels. Bastian (Barret Oliver) is dealing with his mother’s recent death. His father (Gerald McRaney) is an imperious sort who continually lambastes Bastian for daydreaming and falling behind in school. On top of his father’s badgering, he has to contend with a bunch of school bullies waiting for him in the schoolyard. One day he decides to play hooky and walks into a strange bookstore, where in the attic, he discovers a book called “The Neverending Story”. As Bastian reads the book, he’s enveloped in the unfolding tale. A sickly child-like empress (Tami Stronach) from a land called Fantasia is concerned about who will take over the land if she dies. She decides it is best for Fantasia if she remains alive, so she dispatches a young warrior named Atreju (Noah Hathaway) to find a cure for the empress’s malady. It turns out the land is consumed with a plague called The Nothing, generated by blighted dreams and hopeless fantasies. As Atreju continues onward to search for a cure for The Nothing, he encounters an assortment of strange creatures. Bastian is so consumed with the tale that he finds himself catapulted into the land of Fantasia himself. Atreju realizes that the only way to save the land from its blight is with the help of this strange earth boy, Bastian

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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Love, Actually (2003)

starts December 16

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: This ultimate romantic comedy weaves together a spectacular number of love affairs into one amazing story. [Universal Pictures]

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Manchester by the Sea

starts December 16

After the death of his older brother Joe (Kyle Chandler), Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck) is shocked to learn that Joe has made him sole guardian of his nephew Patrick (Lucas Hedges). Taking leave of his job, Lee reluctantly returns to Manchester-by-the-Sea to care for Patrick, a spirited 15-year-old, and is forced to deal with a past that separated him from his wife Randi (Michelle Williams) and the community where he was born and raised. Bonded by the man who held their family together, Lee and Patrick struggle to adjust to a world without him.

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ON STAGE: THE NUTCRACKER

starts December 23

The Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

In George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™, Tchaikovsky’s beloved melodies transport the young and young at heart to a magical world where mischievous mice besiege a battalion of toy soldiers, and an onstage blizzard leads to an enchanted Land of Sweets. New York City Ballet‘s famously extravagant staging features Balanchine’s stunning choreography amidst awe-inspiring set pieces, ornate costumes and grand one-of-a-kind visual effects, like the one-tonne Christmas tree that grows to an astonishing 12 meters.

Set to Tchaikovsky’s score, Balanchine’s Nutcracker features New York City Ballet’s roster of more than 150 dancers and musicians, as well as two alternating casts of 50 children from the School of American Ballet, the New York City Ballet’s official school. In addition to Balanchine’s choreography, the work features scenery by Rouben Ter-Arutunian, costumes by Karinska and lighting by Mark Stanley, after the original design by Ronald Bates.

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The Eagle Huntress

starts December 23

The Eagle Huntress follows Aisholpan, a 13-year-old girl, as she trains to become the first female in twelve generations of her Kazakh family to become an eagle hunter, and rises to the pinnacle of a tradition that has been handed down from father to son for centuries. [Sony Pictures Classics]

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An Inconvenient Truth (2006)

starts January 14

It’s been 10 years since An Inconvenient Truth movie came out. For this special presentation of our Science on Screen series, we’ve invited two scientists (Dr. Janice Greene and Dr. Alexander Wait from MSU’s Biology Department) to discuss what has changed (and what has not) since this groundbreaking movie was released 10 years ago.

Film Synopsis: This documentary offers a passionate and inspirational look at Al Gore’s fervent crusade to halt global warming’s deadly progress in its tracks by exposing the myths and misconceptions that surround it. (Participant Productions)

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Annie (1982)

starts January 20

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Summary: The story of a plucky, red-haired girl who dreams of life outside her dreary orphanage. One day, Annie (Quinn) is chosen to stay for one week with the famous billionaire “Daddy” Warbucks (Finney). One week turns into many and the only person standing in the way of Annie’s fun is Miss Hannigan, the gin-soaked ruler of the orphanage (Burnett). (Sony)

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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20th Century Women

starts January 20

Set in Santa Barbara, 20th Century Women follows Dorothea Fields (Annette Bening), a determined single mother in her mid-50s who is raising her adolescent son, Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann) at a moment brimming with cultural change and rebellion. Dorothea enlists the help of two younger women in Jamie’s upbringing — via Abbie (Greta Gerwig), a free-spirited punk artist living as a boarder in the Fields’ home, and Julie (Elle Fanning), a savvy and provocative teenage neighbor. 20th Century Women is a poignant love letter to the people who raise us – and the times that form us – as this makeshift family forges fragile connections that will mystify and inspire them through their lives. [A24]

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Brazil (1985)

starts January 27

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: Brazil is a surrealistic nightmare vision of a “perfect” future where technology reigns supreme. Everyone is monitored by a secret government agency that forbids love to interfere with efficiency. When a daydreaming bureaucrat (Pryce) becomes unwittingly involved with an underground superhero and a beautiful mystery woman, he becomes the tragic victim of his own romantic illusions. [Universal Pictures]

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Ice Guardians

starts February 4

xploring one of the most controversial and provocative positions in the history of sport, ‘Ice Guardians’ journeys into the lives of those who perform what is undoubtedly the toughest job within the National Hockey League today, the enforcer. Very few understand this position and even fewer appreciate what is involved in becoming one. It’s a punishing profession unlike any other, holding little mercy for its candidates on or off the ice. Born out of self policing a game where 200 pound men fly towards each other on metal blades with sticks, the role now finds itself facing the scrutiny of national newspapers, on-line blogs and TV news casts. Due to its violent nature, it has drawn opinions from both fans and critics alike. But what do we really know? What led to its spectacular rise? What purpose does it serve in the eyes of its beholders and what drives them forward in the face of adversity? Ice Guardians steps beyond the hype and heads directly to the source of the debate… the players themselves. Through their eyes, tough exteriors are shed to reveal the humanity behind a role that struggles to maintain its existence.

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Bringing Up Baby (1939)

starts February 5

This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

A true iconoclast known for her intelligence, determination and fierce demeanor Katharine Hepburn demonstrated remarkable staying power in a screen career that spanned more than six decades, winning three of her four Best Actress Oscars after the age of 60.

Film Summary: A madcap heiress upsets the staid existence of a straitlaced scientist. [TCM.com]

Bringing Up Baby (1938) is one of versatile director Howard Hawks’ greatest screwball comedies and often considered the definitive screwball film. It is also one of the funniest, wackiest and most inspired films of all time with its characteristic breathless pace, zany antics and pratfalls, absurd situations and misunderstandings, perfect sense of comic timing, completely screwball cast, series of lunatic and hare-brained misadventures, disasters, light-hearted surprises and romantic comedy. [Filmsite.org]

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On Stage: No Man's Land

starts February 11

The Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

Following their hit run on Broadway, Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart return to the West End stage in Harold Pinter’s No Man’s Land, broadcast live to cinemas from Wyndham’s Theatre, London. Also starring Owen Teale and Damien Molony, don’t miss this glorious revival of Pinter’s comic classic. The broadcast will be followed by an exclusive Q&A with the cast and director Sean Mathias.

In No Man’s Land, two elderly men have met in a London pub. Spooner says he’s a poet: Hirst might be a critic. They drink a great deal and they talk about the past, which perhaps they shared. This is Harold Pinter at his wittiest. The comedy even survives the threatening presence of two younger men. Since its premiere in 1975 and its acclaimed London revival in 2008, No Man’s Land has been hailed as one of Pinter’s “indisputable modern classics” (Telegraph). Now Ian McKellen (“Spooner”) and Patrick Stewart (“Hirst”) inhabit this unsettling drama. [McKellen.com]

Synopsis: One summer’s evening, two ageing writers, Hirst and Spooner, meet in a Hampstead pub and continue their drinking into the night at Hirst’s stately house nearby. As the pair become increasingly inebriated, and their stories increasingly unbelievable, the lively conversation soon turns into a revealing power game, further complicated by the return home of two sinister younger men.

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The Philadelphia Story (1940)

starts February 12

This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

A true iconoclast known for her intelligence, determination and fierce demeanor Katharine Hepburn demonstrated remarkable staying power in a screen career that spanned more than six decades, winning three of her four Best Actress Oscars after the age of 60.

Film Summary: Set among the upper class in 1930s Philadelphia, this irreverent classic romantic comedy features radiant performances by three legendary stars. On the eve of her marriage to an uninteresting man, a headstrong socialite jousts verbally with her charming ex-husband, drinks too much champagne, and flirts outrageously with a handsome reporter.

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Microcosmos (1996)

starts February 17

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Summary: This fascinating documentary offers a unique look into the daily dramas played out amongst the tiny residents of a French country meadow. It is shot without dialogue and begins with an aerial view of the meadow and then drops wildly down amongst the herbs and soil of the meadow where the stage is set. Using specially designed cameras and lighting equipment, the filmmakers Claude Nuridsany (who also did the extraordinary filming) and Marie Perennou spent three years creating this single day. Utilizing astounding close ups, they give the viewer a bug’s eye view where water drops are the size of planets, and grass blades become alien skyscrapers. At this level, the bugs themselves take on an unearthly appearance, as if they were the giants, not us. Among the things depicted are a caterpillar’s transformation into a butter fly, a dirigible sized bee in flight, and the gentle, passionate lovemaking of snails. In the cycle of life and death, a spider makes a gruesome meal of two grasshoppers, and a determined dung beetle futilely attempts to roll a large prize up a steep slope. A tremendous thunderstorm temporarily disrupts the meadow and then as the day turns to evening, the nocturnal insects slowly emerge for the night shift. The film is suitable for families and features an eclectic soundtrack with numbers ranging from opera to New Age music to high-light the action.

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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Adam's Rib (1949)

starts February 19

This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

A true iconoclast known for her intelligence, determination and fierce demeanor Katharine Hepburn demonstrated remarkable staying power in a screen career that spanned more than six decades, winning three of her four Best Actress Oscars after the age of 60.

Film Summary: Written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin, Adam’s Rib is a peerless comedy predicated on the double standard. Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn play Adam and Amanda Bonner, a husband-and-wife attorney team, both drawn to a case of attempted murder. The defendant (Judy Holliday) had tearfully attempted to shoot her husband (Tom Ewell) and his mistress (Jean Hagen). Adam argues that the case is open and shut, but Amanda points out that, if the defendant were a man, he’d be set free on the basis of “the unwritten law.” Thus it is that Adam works on behalf of the prosecution, while Amanda defends the accused woman. The trial turns into a media circus, while the Bonners’ home life suffers. Adam’s Rib represented the film debuts of New York-based actors Jean Hagen, Tom Ewell, and David Wayne (as Hepburn’s erstwhile songwriting suitor), and the return to Hollywood of Judy Holliday after her Born Yesterday triumph. One of the best of the Tracy-Hepburn efforts, it inspired a brief 1973 TV series starring Ken Howard and Blythe Danner.

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Harold and Maude (1971)

starts February 24

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: With the idiosyncratic American fable Harold and Maude, countercultural director Hal Ashby fashioned what would become the cult classic of its era. Working from a script by Colin Higgins, Ashby tells the story of the emotional and romantic bond between a death-obsessed young man (Bud Cort) from a wealthy family and a devil-may-care, bohemian octogenarian (Ruth Gordon). Equal parts gallows humor and romantic innocence, Harold and Maude dissolves the line between darkness and light along with the ones that separate people by class, gender, and age, and it features indelible performances and a remarkable soundtrack by Cat Stevens. [Criterion Collection]

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The African Queen (1951)

starts February 26

This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

A true iconoclast known for her intelligence, determination and fierce demeanor Katharine Hepburn demonstrated remarkable staying power in a screen career that spanned more than six decades, winning three of her four Best Actress Oscars after the age of 60.

Film Summary: A grizzled skipper and a spirited missionary take on the Germans in Africa during World War I. [TCM.com]

The African Queen (1951) is the uncomplicated tale of two companions with mismatched, “opposites attract” personalities who develop an implausible love affair as they travel together downriver in Africa around the start of World War I. This quixotic film by director John Huston, based on the 1935 novel of the same name by C. S. Forester, is one of the classics of Hollywood adventure filmmaking, with comedy and romance besides. It was the first color film for the two leads and for director Huston. [Filmsite.org]

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I Am Not Your Negro

starts March 10

Director Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished - a radical narration about race in America, using the writer’s original words. He draws upon James Baldwin’s notes on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr to explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America. [Magnolia Pictures]

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On Stage: Amadeus

starts March 11

The Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

Music. Power. Jealousy. Lucian Msamati (Luther, Game of Thrones, NT Live: The Comedy of Errors) plays Salieri in Peter Shaffer’s iconic play, broadcast live from the National Theatre, and with live orchestral accompaniment by Southbank Sinfonia. After winning multiple Olivier and Tony Awards when it had its premiere at the National Theatre in 1979, Amadeus was adapted into an Academy Award-winning film.

Synopsis: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, a rowdy young prodigy, arrives in Vienna, the music capital of the world – and he’s determined to make a splash. Awestruck by his genius, court composer Antonio Salieri has the power to promote his talent or destroy his name. Seized by obsessive jealousy he begins a war with Mozart, with music, and ultimately, with God.

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Boy & the World (2013)

starts March 17

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Summary: Cuca’s cozy rural life is shattered when his father leaves for the city, prompting him to embark on a quest to reunite his family. The young boy’s journey unfolds like a tapestry, the animation taking on greater complexity as his small world expands. Entering civilization, industrial landscapes are inhabited by animal-machines, with barrios of decoupage streets and shop windows, and flashing neon advertisements that illuminate the night. The story depicts a clash between village and city, hand crafted and mechanized, rich and poor - and throughout the tumult, the heart and soul of the people beats on as a song. The film’s music is on equal footing with the stunning visuals, a soundscape of pan-flute, samba, and Brazilian hip-hop mixing with the whirling carnival colors and exploding fireworks.

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)

starts March 24

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: Scott Pilgrim must defeat his new girlfriend’s seven evil exes in order to win her heart.

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Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

starts April 28

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: Playing in a manner that can be conservatively described as larger than life, Kurt Russell plays a macho truck driver who agrees to go to the San Francisco airport and pick up his friend’s (Dennis Dun) fiancee (Suzee Pai, freshly arrived from China. Suddenly, a gang of Chinatown toughs kidnap the girl right before Russell’s eyes. After a wild chase sequence, Russell discovers that the girl has been abducted by a genuine, bonafide sorceror (James Hong), the ghost of a 3000 year old warlord. And that’s just for starters.[Hal Erickson, Rovi]

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More Upcoming Films

News and Events

MOXIE FLIX

Saturday, Dec 17 10:00 am

MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.
Screenings start at 4:30pm on Fridays and 10:00am on Saturdays.

These FREE screenings were made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

Upcoming Films:

Dec. 16 & 17: The Neverending Story (1984) PG; 102m

Jan. 20 & 21: Annie (1982) G; 127m

Feb. 17 & 18: Microcosmos (1996) G; 80m

March 17 & 18: Boy and the World (2013) PG; 80m

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