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Wednesday, March 29

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  • My Life as a Zucchini

    4:30pm

    My Life as a Zucchini
    • Director: Claude Barras
    • Genre(s): Animation, Family
    • Language: English/French
    • Rating: PG-13
    • Running Time: 70 min.
    "Seeing the world through a child’s eyes can be pretty eye-opening. Watching My Life as a Zucchini, the altogether marvelous and Oscar-nominated stop-action animated film by director Claude Barras, that world is one you will not soon forget. "
    - Miriam Di Nunzio, Chicago Sun-Times
    "It’s well worth seeking out for older kids who don’t mind reading subtitles, their parents, and any adults who can appreciate a good story movingly and creatively told. "
    - Ty Burr, Boston Globe
    "The character work here is both intimate and nicely compressed. But the movie really gets to its most sublime heights visually. "
    - Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com
    "Magical is not an oversize word for this exquisite film. "
    - Joe Morgenstern Wall Street Journal
    "As unexpectedly enchanting as its title is initially perplexing, “My Life as a Zucchini” is short but oh so satisfyingly bittersweet, an example of the kind of movie magic that’s always hard to find. "
    - Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times
    "My Life as a Zucchini is so warm, so alive, that we forget we’re watching cartoon figures. "
    - Stephanie Zacharek, TIME Magazine
    "Lovingly told and gorgeously rendered. "
    - Boyd van Hoeij, Hollywood Reporter
    "It’s a simple story of children who have to figure out, at too young an age, what kind of people they’ll be. And in its pervasive sense of hope, Barras seems to suggest that they can be anybody they want. There’s always still time, as long as love remains in the world. "
    - Dominick Suzanne-Mayer, Consequence of Sound
    "A compact triumph of stop-motion animation in the service of a bittersweet tale, My Life As A Courgette (My Vie de Courgette) is as delightful as it is affecting. "
    - Lisa Nesselson, Screen International
    "A testament to the power of community to heal the deepest wounds, My Life As A Zucchini takes on heavy subject matter with a light hand, and comes up with a delightful tale that is equal parts wrenching and uplifting. "
    - Jude Dry, Indiewire
  • The Sense of an Ending

    6:30pm

    The Sense of an Ending
    • Starring: Charlotte Rampling, Jim Broadbent
    • Director: Ritesh Batra
    • Genre(s): Drama
    • Rating: PG-13
    • Running Time: 108 min.
    "Modest in its ambition but profound in its specificity, Batra gets to the core of the slipperiness of memory and the allure of the past. It’s not through grand pronouncements and cosmic love stories; instead, a handful of unshakable moments do the trick. "
    - Steve Greene, Indiewire
    "The lineup of fine actors keenly registers minute details about the passage of time with humor, wisdom and a sharp sense of how moments of rash or just misguided behavior can forever dictate a life’s path. "
    - Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter
    "Its most receptive audiences will almost certainly be older, with enough life experience to recognize the mix of curiosity and regret that ensnares us like so many wild brambles each time we hazard a stroll down Memory Lane. "
    - Peter Debruge, Variety
  • On Stage: The Sleeping Beauty

    3:45pm

    On Stage: The Sleeping Beauty
    • Starring: The Royal Ballet
    • Director: Koen Kessels
    • Choreographer: Marius Petipa
    • Genre(s): Romance, Drama, Performing Arts
    • Rating: NR
    • Filmed February 28th 2017 at The Royal Opera House in London.
    • Running Time: Approx. 3 Hours with 2 Intervals
    "If you want spectacle at the ballet then this Sleeping Beauty is for you. Based on the opulent production that reopened the Royal Opera House after the Second World War, Monica Mason and Christopher Newton’s staging is a sumptuous homage to the splendour of the French court of Louis XIV. "
    - Debra Craine, The Times
    "A sumptuous banquet of a ballet, beautifully presented. "
    - Neil Norman, The Stage
    "70 years ago, the Royal Opera House reopened after the war with The Sleeping Beauty, a symbolic reawakening. The Royal Ballet’s revival of that same production mixes nostalgia and celebration, reverence and compromise. "
    - Zoë Anderson, Independent
  • Wilson

    7:15pm

    Wilson
    • Starring: Woody Harrelson, Judy Greer, Laura Dern
    • Director: Craig Johnson
    • Genre(s): Comedy
    • Rating: R
    • Running Time: 94 min.
    "Harrelson makes the character his own, irresistibly. "
    - A.A. Dowd, AV Club
    "Tackling this material was a tricky proposition, but the movie pulls off some endearing qualities thanks to director Craig Johnson. "
    - Eric Kohn, indieWire
    "Wilson has much of the same everything-sucks humor that gave Clowes’ “Ghost World” such sardonic punch 15 years ago, and Harrelson has a ball delivering insults with that goofy grin on his face. "
    - Sara Stewart, New York Post

Coming Soon

The Zookeeper's Wife

starts March 31

In 1939 Poland, Antonina Żabińska (Jessica Chastain) and her husband, Dr. Jan Żabiński (Johan Heldenbergh), have the Warsaw Zoo flourishing under his stewardship and her care. When their country is invaded by the Nazis, Jan and Antonina are stunned – and forced to report to the Reich’s newly appointed chief zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl). To fight back on their own terms, Antonina and Jan covertly begin working with the Resistance – and put into action plans to save lives out of what has become the Warsaw Ghetto, with Antonina putting herself and even her children at great risk

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The Sea Inside (Drury @ The Moxie)

starts April 1

Dr. Chris Panza will lead a post show discussion of the film.

Great insights to great films courtesy of Drury’s Humanities faculty.

This series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

Winner of the 2004 Academy Award (and 2004 Golden Globe Award) for Best Foreign Film, Alejandro Amenabar’s Mar Adentro (The Sea Inside) is beautifully filmed, deeply emotional, thoughtful, and provocative. It tells the (true life) story of Ramon Sampedro, a Spanish man who as a result of being paralyzed in a tragic diving accident, pursues a nearly thirty year battle to win the right to voluntarily end his life and die with dignity. A tour de force that captures us from beginning to end, the film raises powerful questions about the value of life, the morality of euthanasia, the nature and depth of our ethical obligations to others, and the role of the family. It is simply impossible to leave this film unmoved on a fundamental level.

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The Martian (2015)

starts April 4

The Science on Screen film series is a creative pairing of classic, cult, and documentary films with a post show discussion by notable figures from the world of science, technology, and medicine.

Dr. Michelle Bowe (MSU, Biology) and Charles Armstrong (NASA External Relations) will lead a discussion of the film.

Admission price is $9 for Adults /$8 for Seniors and Students Free for Members

Film Synopsis: During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and finds himself stranded and alone on the hostile planet. With only meager supplies, he must draw upon his ingenuity, wit and spirit to subsist and find a way to signal to Earth that he is alive. Millions of miles away, NASA and a team of international scientists work tirelessly to bring “the Martian” home, while his crewmates concurrently plot a daring, if not impossible rescue mission. As these stories of incredible bravery unfold, the world comes together to root for Watney’s safe return. [20th Century Fox]

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Song To Song

starts April 7

In this modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene, two entangled couples—struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling), and music mogul Cook (Michael Fassbender) and the waitress whom he ensnares (Natalie Portman)—chase success through a rock ‘n’ roll landscape of seduction and betrayal.

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Paths of Glory (1957)

starts April 8

This FREE SCREENING is part of the Springfield Greene County Library’s “One Read” project, commemorating America’s entrance into World War I.

Film Summary: Stanley Kubrick’s Paths of Glory is among the most powerful antiwar films ever made. A fiery Kirk Douglas stars as a World War I French colonel who goes head-to-head with the army’s ruthless top brass when his men are accused of cowardice after being unable to carry out an impossible mission. This haunting, exquisitely photographed dissection of the military machine in all its absurdity and capacity for dehumanization (a theme Kubrick would continue to explore throughout his career) is assembled with its legendary director’s customary precision, from its tense trench warfare sequences to its gripping courtroom climax to its ravaging final scene. [The Criterion Collection]

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On Stage: Hedda Gabler

starts April 9

The Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

Production Information:

“I’ve no talent for life.”

Just married. Buried alive. Hedda longs to be free…

Hedda and Tesman have just returned from their honeymoon and the relationship is already in trouble. Trapped but determined, Hedda tries to control those around her, only to see her own world unravel.

Tony Award-winning director Ivo van Hove (A View from the Bridge at the Young Vic Theatre) returns to National Theatre Live screens with a modern production of Ibsen’s masterpiece.

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Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

starts April 11

The Science on Screen film series is a creative pairing of classic, cult, and documentary films with a post show discussion by notable figures from the world of science, technology, and medicine.

Dr. Toby J. Dogwiler (MSU, Geography Geology and Planning) will lead a discussion of the film.

Admission price is $9 for Adults /$8 for Seniors and Students Free for Members

Film Synopsis: In the furthest reaches of our planet, in a stark desert landscape where humanity is broken, and everyone is fighting for the necessities of life, there are two rebels who just might be able to restore order—Max (Tom Hardy), a man of action and few words, who seeks peace of mind following the loss of his wife and child in the aftermath of the chaos, and Furiosa (Charlize Theron), a woman of action who believes her path to survival may be achieved if she can make it across the desert back to her childhood homeland.

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Boy & the World (2013)

starts April 14

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Summary: Cuca’s cozy rural life is shattered when his father leaves for the city, prompting him to embark on a quest to reunite his family. The young boy’s journey unfolds like a tapestry, the animation taking on greater complexity as his small world expands. Entering civilization, industrial landscapes are inhabited by animal-machines, with barrios of decoupage streets and shop windows, and flashing neon advertisements that illuminate the night. The story depicts a clash between village and city, hand crafted and mechanized, rich and poor - and throughout the tumult, the heart and soul of the people beats on as a song. The film’s music is on equal footing with the stunning visuals, a soundscape of pan-flute, samba, and Brazilian hip-hop mixing with the whirling carnival colors and exploding fireworks.

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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Toni Erdmann

starts April 14

Winfried (Peter Simonischek) doesn’t see much of his working daughter Ines (Sandra Hüller). The suddenly student-less music teacher decides to surprise her with a visit after the death of his old dog. It’s an awkward move because serious career woman Ines is working on an important project as a corporate strategist in Bucharest. The geographical change doesn’t help the two to see more eye to eye. Practical joker Winfried loves to annoy his daughter with corny pranks. What’s worse are his little jabs at her routine lifestyle of long meetings, hotel bars and performance reports. Father and daughter reach an impasse, and Winfried agrees to return home to Germany. Enter flashy Toni Erdmann: Winfried’s smooth-talking alter ego. Disguised in a tacky suit, weird wig and even weirder fake teeth, Toni barges into Ines’ professional life, claiming to be her CEO’s life coach. As Toni, Winfried is bolder and doesn’t hold back, but Ines meets the challenge. The harder they push, the closer they become. In all the madness, Ines begins to understand that her eccentric father might deserve some place in her life after all. [Sony Pictures Classics]

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Kedi

starts April 14

Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. For thousands of years they’ve wandered in and out of people’s lives, becoming an essential part of the communities that make the city so rich. Claiming no owners, the cats of Istanbul live between two worlds, neither wild nor tame –and they bring joy and purpose to those people they choose to adopt. In Istanbul, cats are the mirrors to the people, allowing them to reflect on their lives in ways nothing else could.

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A Farewell to Arms (1932)

starts April 15

FREE SCREENING that is part of the Springfield Greene County Library “One Read” project, to commemorate the centennial of the U.S. entering WWI.

Film Summary: A tale of the love between ambulance driver Lt. Henry and Nurse Catherine Barkley during World War I. The action takes place in Italy and the two fall in love during the war and will stop at nothing to be together.

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The Conversation (1974)

starts April 18

The Science on Screen film series is a creative pairing of classic, cult, and documentary films with a post show discussion by notable figures from the world of science, technology, and medicine.

Dr. Shannon McMurtrey (DRURY, Computer sciences/Security) will lead a discussion of the film.

Admission price is $9 for Adults /$8 for Seniors and Students Free for Members

Film Synopsis: The Conversation (1974) is the slowly-gripping, bleak study of electronic surveillance and threat of new technologies that is examined through the private, internalized life of a lonely and detached expert ‘bugger.’ The conspiracy thriller is an effective character study that exposes the emerging conscience of an estranged eavesdropper whose work once resulted in the death of three people. [Filmsite.org]

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Free Fire

starts April 21

Justine (Brie Larson) has brokered a meeting in a deserted warehouse between two Irishmen and a gang led by Vernon (Sharlto Copley) and Ord (Armie Hammer), who are selling them a stash of guns. But when shots are fired during the handover, complete pandemonium ensues, with everyone at the scene suddenly thrust into a heart-stopping game of survival.

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Son of Man (Drury @ The Moxie)

starts April 22

Dr. Teresa J. Hornsby will lead a post show discussion of the film.

Great insights to great films courtesy of Drury’s Humanities faculty.

This series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

Son of Man (2006) is a powerful retelling of the story of Jesus. South African director Mark Dornford-May stays true to the Gospel stories but transposes first century Judea’s extreme poverty, perpetual cycle of violence, and its depravity of corrupt politicians to a contemporary, Soweto-esque township in South Africa. This film is an innovative and visually stunning presentation of that well-known story. More than any other “Jesus” film, it transcends historical context by portraying the destitution of the time, while conveying the sliver of hope that began within a small circle of revolutionaries and spread to millions. The personal is political.

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Personal Shopper

starts April 24

Maureen (Kristen Stewart) has a job she hates: seeing to the wardrobe of a media celebrity. She couldn’t find anything better to pay for her stay in Paris. And wait. Wait for a sign from the spirit of her twin brother, who died a few months earlier. Until then, her life will stay on hold.

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Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

starts April 28

This winter, the Final Friday at Mother’s series moves indoors right here to the Moxie. Since space is a wee bit tighter here than at Mother’s backyard, we will be stretching the screenings over three nights. For each of these movies, Mother’s will be sending us a special keg to tap. Welcome to Mondo with Mother’s!

Film Summary: Playing in a manner that can be conservatively described as larger than life, Kurt Russell plays a macho truck driver who agrees to go to the San Francisco airport and pick up his friend’s (Dennis Dun) fiancee (Suzee Pai, freshly arrived from China. Suddenly, a gang of Chinatown toughs kidnap the girl right before Russell’s eyes. After a wild chase sequence, Russell discovers that the girl has been abducted by a genuine, bonafide sorceror (James Hong), the ghost of a 3000 year old warlord. And that’s just for starters.[Hal Erickson, Rovi]

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Colossal

starts April 28

Gloria (Anne Hathaway) is an ordinary woman who, after losing her job and being kicked out of her apartment by her boyfriend, is forced to leave her life in New York and move back to her hometown. When news reports surface that a giant creature is destroying Seoul, Korea, Gloria gradually comes to the realization that she is somehow connected to this far-off phenomenon. As events begin to spin out of control, Gloria must determine why her seemingly insignificant existence has such a colossal effect on the fate of the world.

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M (1931)

starts April 30

Essential Janus Films
This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Janus Films is the pre-eminent distributor of classic foreign films in the United States. Founded by two Harvard students in 1956, Janus Films was one of the first distributors to bring what are now regarded as the masterpieces of world cinema to American audiences.

Film Summary: A simple, haunting musical phrase whistled offscreen tells us that a young girl will be killed. “Who Is the Murderer?” pleads a nearby placard as serial killer Hans Beckert (Peter Lorre) closes in on little Elsie Beckmann . In his harrowing masterwork M, Fritz Lang merges trenchant social commentary with chilling suspense, creating a panorama of private madness and public hysteria that to this day remains the blueprint for the psychological thriller.

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On Stage: Il trovatore

starts May 7

The Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

Production Information: The Count di Luna loves Leonora, but she loves Manrico, the Count’s military enemy. Manrico’s mother Azucena tells him how her mother was burnt to death for supposed witchcraft against the Count’s baby brother. Azucena intended to throw the baby onto the fire – but blinded by revenge she lost her own child to the flames.

months before that of La traviata. But Il trovatore, while no less popular than its neighbours, is quite different. Verdi himself had suggested the source material, Antonio García Gutiérrez’s play El trovador (1836), to his librettist Salvatore Cammarano. He encouraged Cammarano to pursue the same cross-genre developments Verdi had introduced in Rigoletto, writing in an early letter ‘if the entire opera were, let’s say, a single piece, I would find it more reasonable and just’. As it happens, the end result is highly formal in structure, and seems to look back before the innovations of Rigoletto – but audiences since the opera’s premiere have been captivated by its great dramatic concision and energy.

Il trovatore is probably best known for its ‘gypsy’ music – the Anvil Chorus, Azucena’s ‘Stride la vampa’ and Manrico’s heroic ‘Di quella pira’ are key examples. But Verdi wrote wonderful music for all four of his leads, with the ‘aristocratic’ ‘Il balen del suo sorriso’ for the Count, and Leonora’s prayer ‘D’amor sull’ali rosee’ among a host of thrilling ensembles and chorus numbers. German director David Bösch, celebrated for his theatrical productions for Munich and Frankfurt among others, makes his UK debut with this new production for The Royal Opera. The opera’s themes of jealousy, revenge and love play out against a hauntingly beautiful, wintry landscape that has been riven by war.

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The Rules of the Game (1939)

starts May 7

Essential Janus Films
This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Janus Films is the pre-eminent distributor of classic foreign films in the United States. Founded by two Harvard students in 1956, Janus Films was one of the first distributors to bring what are now regarded as the masterpieces of world cinema to American audiences.

La Regle Du Jeu (1939) now often cited as one of the greatest films ever made, Jean Renoir’s La Règle du jeu/Rules of the Game was not warmly received on its original release in 1939: audiences at its opening engagements in Paris were openly hostile, responding to the film with shouts of derision, and distributors cut the movie from 113 minutes to a mere 80. It was banned as morally perilous during the German occupation and the original negative was destroyed during WWII. It wasn’t until 1956 that Renoir was able to restore the film to its original length. In retrospect, this reaction seems both puzzling and understandable; at its heart, Rules of the Game is a very moral film about frequently amoral people.

Film Summary: A bourgeois life in France at the onset of World War II, as the rich and their poor servants meet up at a French chateau.

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Rashomon (1950)

starts May 14

Essential Janus Films
This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Janus Films is the pre-eminent distributor of classic foreign films in the United States. Founded by two Harvard students in 1956, Janus Films was one of the first distributors to bring what are now regarded as the masterpieces of world cinema to American audiences.

This landmark Japanese masterpiece is Akira Kurosawa’s cinematic examination of the subjective nature of truth. In A riveting psychological thriller that investigates the nature of truth and the meaning of justice, Rashomon is widely considered one of the greatest films ever made. Four people give different accounts of a man’s murder and the rape of his wife, which director Akira Kurosawa presents with striking imagery and an ingenious use of flashbacks. This eloquent masterwork and international sensation revolutionized film language and introduced Japanese cinema—and a commanding new star by the name of Toshiro Mifune—to the Western world.

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Swing Time (1936)

starts May 19

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Synopsis: The sixth of RKO’s Fred Astaire -Ginger Rogers pairings of the 1930s, Swing Time starts off with bandleader Astaire getting cold feet on his wedding day. Astaire’s bride-to-be Betty Furness will give him a second chance, providing he proves himself responsible enough to earn $25,000. Astaire naturally tries to avoid earning that amount once he falls in love with dance instructor Ginger Rogers. Numerous complications ensue, leading to the “second time’s the charm” climax, with Ginger escaping her own wedding to wealthy Georges Metaxa in order to be reunited with Astaire. The film’s most indelible image is that of Fred Astaire, immaculately attired in top hat and tails, hopping a freight car—a perfect encapsulation of the film’s Depression-era cheekiness. The Jerome Kern-Dorothy Fields score includes such standards-to-be as “Pick Yourself Up,” “A Fine Romance,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Never Gonna Dance” and “Bojangles of Harlem.” The peerless supporting cast of Swing Time includes Helen Broderick, Victor Moore, Eric Blore, and Landers Stevens, the actor-father of the film’s director, George Stevens. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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The Seventh Seal (1957)

starts May 21

Essential Janus Films
This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Janus Films is the pre-eminent distributor of classic foreign films in the United States. Founded by two Harvard students in 1956, Janus Films was one of the first distributors to bring what are now regarded as the masterpieces of world cinema to American audiences.

Disillusioned and exhausted after a decade of battling in the Crusades, a knight (Max von Sydow) encounters Death on a desolate beach and challenges him to a fateful game of chess. Much studied, imitated, even parodied, but never outdone, Bergman’s stunning allegory of man’s search for meaning, The Seventh Seal (Det sjunde inseglet), was one of the benchmark foreign imports of America’s 1950s art-house heyday, pushing cinema’s boundaries and ushering in a new era of moviegoing.

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On Stage: The Bolshoi: A Contemporary Evening

starts May 28

Moxie: On Stage is a new series showcasing world class performances from stages across the globe.

Tickets: $20/adults; $15/members & students

This series is made possible thanks to a grant from the Springfield Regional Arts Council.

Production Information: For one evening, the Bolshoi takes on a new challenge with audacity in The Cage by Jerome Robbins, Harald Lander’s Études and Alexei Ratmansky’s Russian Seasons.

This encounter between some of the best dancers in the world and masters of contemporary choreography results in an outstanding synthesis of bringing Robbins’s energy, Lander’s virtuosity, and Ratmansky’s witty brilliance to a new level.

For the first time, the company performs The Cage by legendary Academy Award-winning choreographer Jerome Robbins, a master of visualizing and translating music to movement. Together with Harald Lander’s homage to classical ballet in Études and Alexei Ratmansky’s colorful folklore-inspired Russian Seasons, A Contemporary Evening brings some of the best dancers in the world together with masters of contemporary choreography.

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L'Avventura (1960)

starts May 28

Essential Janus Films
This new quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Janus Films is the pre-eminent distributor of classic foreign films in the United States. Founded by two Harvard students in 1956, Janus Films was one of the first distributors to bring what are now regarded as the masterpieces of world cinema to American audiences.

Michelangelo Antonioni invented a new film grammar with this masterwork. An iconic piece of challenging 1960s cinema and a gripping narrative on its own terms, L’avventura concerns the enigmatic disappearance of a young woman during a yachting trip off the coast of Sicily, and the search taken up by her disaffected lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and best friend (Monica Vitti, in her breakout role). Antonioni’s controversial international sensation is a gorgeously shot tale of modern ennui and spiritual isolation.

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The Secret of NIMH (1982)

starts June 23

These FREE screenings are part of MOXIE FLIX, a monthly series focusing on essential films for kids to see before they turn 13.

Film Synopsis: Frustrated with the Walt Disney studio’s reluctance to produce full-length animated films, Don Bluth and a number of animators left the studio in the early ’80s with the intent of creating movies in the style of Disney’s classics. The Secret of NIMH is the first film Bluth produced after leaving the studio. Adapted from Robert C. O’Brien’s acclaimed children’s book Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of N.I.M.H., the film is about a widowed mouse whose home is threatened; also, one of her children is gravely ill. On her way to find help, she discovers NIMH, a secret society of highly-intelligent rats who have escaped from a nearby science lab. The rats help the widow to protect her family and home. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

A thorough, spoiler-filled Parent’s Guide can be found here.

Made possible thanks to a generous grant from the Missouri Arts Council.

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